The Value of Diary-Writing : Presentations by Cornelia

Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Of Interest | Comments Off on The Value of Diary-Writing : Presentations by Cornelia

Dear Diary

It has been said that “the first duty of love is to listen”( theologian Paul Tillich.) Freud spoke of the “talking cure.”  But what if there isn’t  someone to talk to?  Keeping a diary can provide a listening ear. Women write diaries to try to make sense out of life, to express their feelings honestly, especially when writing may be their only opportunity for that honesty.

Diaries preserve the voices of women and girls so that when we read their diaries we hear their voices speaking to us through time. Diaries of girls and women are an important primary source for understanding women’s lives.  The experiences, private thoughts and stories of daily life recorded in diaries help historians (herstorians) understand the lives of ordinary women.

Cornelia, a daily diary-writer herself (how else can you use beautiful fountain pens?) whose several hundred diaries (so far) are being archived at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America,  has presented programs about the value of diaries in a number of different settings :  at the Sewall  Belmont House and Museum in Washington, D.C., http://www.sewallbelmont.org, (home of Alice Paul, early suffragette);  at the annual conference of the National Association of Women’s Studies, http://www.nwsa.org, at the Northwestern Summer Writer’s Conference, at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute of Northwestern University http://www.sps.northwestern.edu, and at the Creativity & Madness Conference in Santa Fe, N.M. http://www.creativityandmadness.com.  If your women’s group, book club, library, or organization would like such a presentation, contact corneliamaude119@gmail.com.

Here’s a list of some books which are diaries or collections of diaries:

Brittain, Vera, CHRONICLE OF YOUTH, THE WAR DIARY 1913-1917

Bunker, Suzanne L. (editor), DIARIES OF GIRLS AND WOMEN-A MIDWESTERN AMERICAN SAMPLER

Cahill, Susan (edItor), WRITING WOMEN’S LIVES-AN ANTHOLOGY OF AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NARRATIVES BY TWENTIETH CENTUR WOMEN WRITERS

Franklin, Penelope (editor), PRIVATE PAGES; DIARIES OF AMERICAN WOMEN 1830’S-1970’S

Moffatt, Mary Jane; Painter, Charlotte (editors), REVELATIONS; DIARIES OF WOMEN

Salomon, Charlotte, CHARLOTTE, A DIARY IN PICTURES

Sarton, May, JOURNAL OF A SOLITUDE; EIGHTY-TWO, A JOURNAL

Schlissel, Lillian, WOMEN’S DIARIES OF THE WESTWARD JOURNEY

Scott, Margaret (editor), THE KATHARINE MANSFIELD NOTEBOOKS

Rose, Phyllis (editor) THE NORTON BOOK OF WOMEN’S LIVES

Website for the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

 

Our Emotional “Legacies” presentations by Cornelia

Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Of Interest | Comments Off on Our Emotional “Legacies” presentations by Cornelia

The stories that were most critical in the formation of one’s mother ( and grandmother) are often the very stories that she has not talked about.  There are also, in many families, perhaps most families, secrets.  Both the unspoken and the hidden stories invite us, if we wish to understand the present, to become detectives of the past.  Cornelia has presented workshops in a variety of settings which help women think about their own emotional legacies and important family stories.  She asks each attendee to bring an object passed down in a family and to share a few words about it.

Some of the venues for emotional legacy workshops: women’s clubs, book clubs, libraries, conferences.

If your group is interested in a workshop about emotional legacies, contact Cornelia at corneliamaude119@gmail.com.

(Photo: Cornelia’s mother and great-grandmother)

Welcome to My Chinese Readers

Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Of Interest | Comments Off on Welcome to My Chinese Readers

 
亲爱的中文读者和家长朋友,欢迎您 阅读我的儿童书籍!希望我的故事书对您和您的孩子都有帮助,并衷心祝愿您和您的家人身体健康,万事如意,阖家幸福!
親愛的中文讀者和家長朋友,歡迎您 閱讀我的兒童書籍!希望我的故事書對您和您的孩子都有幫助,並衷心祝願您和您的家人身體健康,萬事如意,闔家幸福!

Hello and welcome to my Chinese readers!  I hope that my books are helpful to you and your children.  I cannot speak or read Chinese but my friend has written these words for me so that can I can wish you health, happiness, and a loving relationship with your child.simplifiedchinese1complexchinese1

 
亲爱的中文读者和家长朋友,欢迎您 阅读我的儿童书籍!希望我的故事书对您和您的孩子都有帮助,并衷心祝愿您和您的家人身体健康,万事如意,阖家幸福!
親愛的中文讀者和家長朋友,歡迎您 閱讀我的兒童書籍!希望我的故事書對您和您的孩子都有幫助,並衷心祝願您和您的家人身體健康,萬事如意,闔家幸福!

 

 

 

Video of “I Feel” Exhibit

Posted by on Jan 3, 2014 in Of Interest | Comments Off on Video of “I Feel” Exhibit

Video of “I Feel” Exhibit

A  video about the “I Feel” exhibit is available for viewing at The Cleveland Children’s Museum.

“The Way I Feel” Series Also Helpful to Special Needs Kids

Posted by on Apr 1, 2004 in Of Interest | Comments Off on “The Way I Feel” Series Also Helpful to Special Needs Kids

Cornelia received a letter through this website from the mother of a special needs child:

“Dear Ms. Spelman,
My five-year-old son absolutely loves this series.  As a child challenged with high-functioning autism, understanding and expressing emotion has been difficult for him.  He’s made some remarkable progress with your series [“The Way I Feel” books].  There’s finally some understanding of degrees of emotions.  He’s able to talk himself through situations more and more rather than melting down.

The books have given us a framework and elicited some deep conversations between us.  Through these conversations, I now have some insight into some of the issues we struggle with on a daily basis.  One such example is in the book When I Feel Jealous. The scene which depicts two characters enjoying their ice cream and another looking on with jealousy is analogous to several situations we’ve encountered where my son just falls apart.  We talked about the situation and I mentioned that maybe that other character can go inside and ask his mommy for some ice cream.  This didn’t seem to satisfy my son.  He insisted that the character “did not want to have ice cream inside with his mommy, he wanted to have ice cream with the other kids.”

The statement underscored a feeling that I’d had for a while.  My son’s seemingly jealous feelings seem to stem from his social deficits.  He wants to engage with other children and share their joy, their toys, their fun but it’s extremely difficult for him to do so.

I especially love the way you summarize your books by saying “When I feel___, I know just what to do.”  Brilliant!

My son often chooses to bring your books to his mainstream pre-K class to share at story time.  The teacher and kids love them!  Last week they read When I Feel Angry and all the kids were practicing the breathing exercises illustrated in the books.  Very cute!

Thanks for a great series!”
(name withheld for privacy)

Spelman’s note:  “I would like to thank this mother for taking the time to write me.  It makes me very happy to think about my books bringing some measure of help and comfort to kids, especially to those already struggling with special challenges.  ‘When you write me, I feel happy!’”